BIOTIC Species Information for Himanthalia elongata
Click here to view the MarLIN Key Information Review for Himanthalia elongata
Researched byNicola White Data supplied byMarLIN
Refereed byDr Dagmar Stengel
General Biology
Growth formCapitate / Clubbed
Straplike / Ribbonlike
Feeding methodPhotoautotroph
Mobility/MovementPermanent attachment
Environmental positionEpifloral
Epilithic
Typical food typesNot relevant HabitAttached
BioturbatorNot relevant FlexibilityHigh (>45 degrees)
FragilityIntermediate SizeLarge(>50cm)
Height Growth Ratemax. 16 mm/day
Adult dispersal potentialNone DependencyIndependent
SociabilitySolitary
Toxic/Poisonous?No
General Biology Additional Information
  • Himanthalia elongata has a two stage morphology. A small button-like frond is first produced, from which large strap-like reproductive fronds are formed. The button stage is clubbed shaped at first and then develops into a button shape 2-3 cm in diameter, which is connected to the substrate by a holdfast and short stipe. Each button typically produces 2 strap-like reproductive fronds in autumn, although plants have been observed with 1 to 4 straps.
  • "Growth rate" refers to growth of reproductive straps at 10-12 degrees C, which is the optimum growing temperature in spring.
  • "Size at maturity" refers to the minimum diameter of the button, which is required for it to produce receptacles.
Biology References Stengel et al., 1999,
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