Calendar

August's calendar

Gallery

See the images

  • MBA
  • Shore Thing
  • DASSH
  • BIOTIC
  • Marine Aliens
  • Blue Sound
  • Outer Bristol Channel Marine Habitat Study Site
  • Deep-Sea Species Image Catalogue
  • Genus Trait Handbook

Contact, Enquiries & Feedback

Recent questions

Date asked 21 April 2009

Question

does laminaria digitata contain
sodium cloride?

Response

Dear Phoebe,

Thank you for your enquiry. Dr John Bothwell (Leverhulme Research Fellow at the MBA) replies:

Sodium chloride (=NaCl) is made up of two different ions: sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-). In its solid form, these two ions stay bound together. However, when NaCl is put into water, the ions split from each other to give Na+ and Cl-. All living things contain Na+ and Cl- ions, including L. digitata. Those ions come, ultimately, from the seawater in which the kelps grow. So, yes, L. digitata contains sodium chloride, but so will any animal or plant.

I hope that is useful

Regards

Guy

P.s. Perhaps a web search for pages on marine algae and nutrition may indicate the levels of sodium chloride present.


Date asked 16 April 2009

Question

can you give me some mare information on killer whales? if you do, please tell me.

Response

Dear Emily,

Thank you for your enquiry. Have you seen the MarLIN page on killer whales at:
www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Orcinusorca.htm

You could also try the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society at:
www.wdcs.org.uk/

And the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust have a good information page on killer whales:

www.whaledolphintrust.co.uk/index.asp

Good luck

Guy


Date asked 15 April 2009

Question

I want to use the Derma Fucus Patch, but i am allergic to iodine, is it safe for me to use

Response


Date asked 09 April 2009

Question

To whomever it may concern. I am currently doing my 3rd year dissertation project at Bangor University on how climate change has effected the marine biodiversity around the UK and was wondering if there were any species which you thought this theory strongly applied to and what evidence there was to back this up. If you so desire, I can send you a copy of what I have researched so far.

Response

Dear Daisy,

Thank you for your enquiry.
As a first port-of-call you could look download our Marine Life Topic Note on Climate change from:
www.marlin.ac.uk/learningzone/MarineLifeTopicNotes.php

This considers climate change from the perspective of UK marine life and has some useful references.

I hope this helps

Regards

Guy


Date asked 07 April 2009

Question

me and my wife are huge fans of British rockpools where we can find all sorts of sea creatures, but we are short of information on where exactly we can find beach with rockpools in this country, is there any way we can get this kind of information? Our holiday sometimes are based on the this. Thanks!

Response

Dear Richard,

Thank you for your email. The best areas for rockpools are in the west of England and Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Pembrokeshire, Devon and Cornwall are all particularly good as you can find warm and cool water species in the same place.
The Learning Zone of the MarLIN website is a good place to find information about UK seashore life. Visit:
http://www.marlin.ac.uk/learningzone/
The local Wildlife Trusts are a good source of local information once you have decided where you want to go!

Regards

Guy


Date asked 30 March 2009

Question

What are the most significant human/environmental impacts, that affect species and their habitats?

Response

Dear Alicia,

Thank you for your enquiry.

Probably the most significant human/environmental impacts affecting marine species and their habitats are:

invasions of non-native species,
pollution,
habitat destruction,
over-exploitation of resources (e.g. overfishing), and
climate change.

As a first port-of-call you could download our Marine Life Topic Note on these subjects from:
www.marlin.ac.uk/learningzone/MarineLifeTopicNotes.php

The topic notes look at issues from the perspective of UK marine life and contain some useful references.

I hope this helps

Regards

Guy


Date asked 27 March 2009

Question

Hi Ive forgotten my login details
I thought they were fyldecoastand starfish but this doesnt work. Is there any way you can email me my login stuff t my registered email
klt2003@ic24.net?
I ve soe records on from the fylde coast (fleetwood, blackpool area)
Many thanks
Kathryn

Response


Date asked 26 March 2009

Question

while walking along the beach in Lincoln City, Oregon in the United States, my friend and I came across hundreds of these little round clear jelly spheres about the size of a marbel. While some were slightly larger or smaller, they were all basically the same size. They also seemed to have a sort of 'ribbed' texture with lines that appeared to run from top to bottom or side to side (depending on how you look at it). We held them above our flash lights and noticed that inside there seemed to be small white squigly lines, and in one case, a hint of red squigly lines. If you want to see a picture I posted pictures of a couple of them on my 'my space' page in my mobile photos. My name is Heather Templeton and my screen name appears as '(//_-) Lady' please feel free to take a look. I would like to know what they are. You can email me at lilsischick@yahoo.com or you can message me over my space. I hope you respond. Thank you so much for your time.

Response

Dear Heather,

Thank you for your enquiry. The little jelly spheres you saw are sea gooseberries, members of the Phylum Ctenophora. Sea gooseberries are carnivorous and can be found all around the world. See the MarLIN page for more information:
www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Pleurobrachiapileus.htm

Regards

Guy


Date asked 25 March 2009

Question

Hi, I'm leading NGO that deals with problems of biodiversity loss in Croatia. I'm organizing an event with children to celebrate World Water Day and Earth Day. I planned to have lessons on the beach, beach cleanup, games and quizzes... I'm new at this so would appreciate any help. If you could send me some materials, ideas or something...thanks

Response

Dear Ivana,

Thank you for your email. We have put together a guide for people who want to run seashore events for children. I attach a copy.

Also, you can download and print copies of the Seashore Code from our website:

www.marlin.ac.uk/learningzone/ and click on the limpet.

You can use the Seashore Code to talk to people about how to enjoy the seashore without damaging it. There are more resources on the Learning Zone part of the website such as species pages, topic notes on marine conservation issues and games and quizzes.

I hope these are useful and good luck with your event.

Regards

Guy


Date asked 21 March 2009

Question

hi my name is iain mckellar i sell seaweed www.justseaweed.com i am looking to expand my seaweed buisness into the edible seaweed market i wnto sell fresh .Laminaria digitata oarweed. Laminaria saccharina sugar kelp.(spring Dabberlocks Alaria esculenta, im workin with the isle of bute enviremantal officer to find utt if thes seaweeds are infack edible im gooing to send some away to glasgow for testing for metals. we have water reports from sepa. can you help me in determaning how long a use by date i shuld be puting on any packaging.

Response

Dear Iain,

Thank you for your enquiry. I think that is a public health question and so beyond our scope. You could try contacting the Food Standards Agency:

www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/regulation/hygleg/

I suspect you would need to supply them with information on the way you process and prepare the seaweed.

I hope that is helpful

Guy


Date asked 19 March 2009

Question

What is the body plan of a jewel anemone?
Symmetry?
Germ Layer?
Level of organization?
Reproduction?

Response

Dear Morgan,

Thank you for your enquiry. For information on jewel anemones see the MarLIN basic information page:

http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Corynactisviridis.htm

For more information on anemones you could look at the MarLIN full review page for other species, for example the dahlia anemone, Urticina felina:

http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Urticinafelina.htm

You could also try getting hold of the publication:
Sponges, Jellyfish, and Other Simple Animals by Daniel Gilpin & Steve Parker

I hope that is useful.

Regards

Guy


Date asked 16 March 2009

Question

The Second image of Liparis liparis on the Sea Snail page off Species appears to be wrong, it looks to be a Three-bearded Rockling.

Response


Date asked 13 March 2009

Question

Hello,
I've been referring to some of the species pictures in the species and habitats section (which are very useful!!). I think that the picture labelled 'Sagartia elegans var. minita on cobbles' is a photo of Cereus pedunculatus. Not intended as a critisim(!) - just noticed it and thought it might be worth mentioning. Brilliant and useful website - Thanks.

Response

Dear Claire

Thank you for letting us know. You are right it was incorrectly labelled. We have corrected this now. We always appreciate people noticing things like this on the website, and are pleased that you find the site useful.

All the best

Emma


Date asked 06 March 2009

Question

Recently we undertook a survey at Kimmeridge Dorset as part of our Marine Ecology Degree. I was taking photos and have found two anemones that we cannot identify and one type of weed. We would really appreciated if these could be identified as our assignemnts need the info and are due in next wednesday.

Response


Date asked 01 March 2009

Question

I would like to order 20 to sell at Seasearch courses etc

I am the north east Coordinator
is it possible to do a bank transfer,
Thanks

Response

Dear Carrie,

I am sorry to say we have run out of Underwater guides. It might be worth contacting Chris Wood (National Seasearch Coordinator) chris@seasearch.org.uk as he may have some copies.

You also asked about Non-natives guides; I am afraid we have run out of those as well. The only consolation is that you can download them for free from:

www.marlin.ac.uk/marine_aliens

Thank you for your interest in MarLIN

Regards

Guy


Date asked 25 February 2009

Question

Hello, my name is Adam. I am a "fish hobbyist" from county Monaghan seeking information regarding the importation of a small number (2-3) individual "fancy Goldfish" from the USA ( http://www.ranchumaniax.com/ ) to the Republic of Ireland. Any information or advise would be greatfully received! Thanks and kind regards, Adam

Response


Date asked 24 February 2009

Question

Hi - I think one of your key ID features (size up to 60cm) may be a little bit out. Now that's a BIG scallop. Delicious

Response


Date asked 24 February 2009

Question

Hi. Just a query. I believe the animals appearing in one of your images (P. maximus (faded red) and A. opercularis (beige shells) are in fact ALL Pecten maximus. I see that this image is credited to Keith Hiscock so I am not completely sure, but I am pretty darn sure. The beige shells are a view of the curved valve of this species that normally sits in the sediment (hence the colour difference).

Response


Date asked 03 February 2009

Question

what does a sword fish look like.....I nearly caught a fish....that had a huge sword for a mouth and a huge flying fin on top....can't remember the name???

Response


Date asked 02 February 2009

Question

what zone do green sea turtles live in?

Response

Dear Katie,

MarLIN holds information on the marine life of the North East Atlantic. Green sea turtles are occasional visitors to waters around the UK as you can see from the MarLIN web page:

http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Cheloniamydas.htm

For more global information I looked on Google and found:

http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/sea-turtle/habitat-&-distribution.htm

I hope that helps

Regards

Guy


Date asked 30 January 2009

Question

Hi , I am a Primary 1 teacher in Renfrewshire and we will be doing a cross curricular project on "under the Sea" after Easter. I was wondering who to contact for more information? Thanks

Response

Dear Anne,

Thank you for getting in touch about your school project. It sounds like a great project and I would be happy to offer some advice if I can. We do a lot of work with schools, including cross-curricular activities, linking science with art, literacy, drama, music, IT, numeracy etc.

I have prepared the attached guide for use by primary school teachers, specifically aimed at using the seashore to teach science. Although it is based around the English curriculum, hopefully it will give you some ideas that will be relevant for you. The guide is currently a draft, so if you have any comments, I would be very grateful!

If you are unable to visit the shore, some of the games and activities in the guide could be adapted for use in the classroom. I am also happy to suggest some other activities and projects. It would be helpful if you could let me know the areas of the curriculum that you would like to include, the ages of the children and if possible any visits you are planning to include and any resources you have available.

You may be interested to know that in the next couple of months, the MarLIN website (www.marlin.ac.uk) will be updated to include a range of new resources for teachers and we are in the process of preparing new resources to be included.

You may also find additional help and resources that are more local to you from the Scottish Association of Marine Science (SAMS) http://www.sams.ac.uk/education/schools.

I hope this helps.

regards


Jack Sewell, (MarLIN)


Date asked 28 January 2009

Question

I work for the great north museum in newcastle
http://www.twmuseums.org.uk/greatnorthmuseum/
We are redevloping our galleries and I am searching for some images of fish to use. I need and image of Pholis gunnellus, gobius niger and pomatuschistus microps. Can we use any of teh images you have? I need to know about this asap and am grateful for your help.

Response

Dear Nicola,
Copyright for images on the MarLIN website remains with the image provider. You need to contact the image provider directly for permission to use the image. The contact details are provided next to the images online.
Once you have permission from the image provider you can use the low resolution images from the site or contact me for the high resolution version.
Please contact me if you need any further help Regards
Guy


Date asked 26 January 2009

Question

I would be most grateful if you would supply me with a definitive macroscopic differentiation between the Common Smoothound and the Starry Smoothound

Response

Dear Mr Mansfield,
I have been forwarded your email from MarLIN.
The only macroscopic difference between the two smoothhounds is their colouration. Whilst I would not usually recommend colouration as a means of differentiating between species, the starry smoothhound can be positively identified by the presence of small white spots over the back and sides.
Other differences between the two species include the dermal denticles on the shoulders (weakly ridged in the starry smoothhound and smooth in the smoothhound), the relative size of and distance between the nostrils (larger and closer together in the starry smoothhound) and the shape of the teeth (flat in the starry smoothhound but with weak cusps in the smoothhound) and tail fin (ventral lobe more pointed in the smoothhound).
I hope this helps!
Best wishes,
Viki


Date asked 23 January 2009

Question

I have permission to use the following image http://www.marlin.ac.uk/php/image_viewer.php?images=corgal&topic=Species by Steve Trewelha. He tells me that you have a high res version avaiable. Please could you email me an A5 (at 300ppi) version to the email address below. Thanks

Response


Date asked 21 January 2009

Question

Could you please recommend some Rockpool areas in the South Devon/Torquay region for seeing a good selection of marine species. Also, any possible Dolphin viewing areas?

Response

Dear Lee,

Thank you for your enquiry. There are lots of great places for exploring marine life in Torbay. You could try Goodrington Sands and Babbacombe both of which have rockpools and seagrass beds.

Goodrington also has a seashore centre where you can find out more local information.

http://www.countryside-trust.org.uk/sc_education.htm

You could speak to the ranger at Berry Head visitor centre (details on the same website) about good dolphin spotting places.

I hope that helps.

Regards

Guy


Date asked 18 January 2009

Question

hallo
I'm an Italian high school student.I hope to can go living in England for a period. it's in my intention approach the marine biology, what do you suggest me tostudy there in england this discipline? what about yours colleges? can you send me some links?
please exscuse my not-elegant english.
Marco Sinopoli.

Response


Date asked 14 January 2009

Question

We spotted a Lithodes maja in a rockpool at low tide on Tynemouth Longsands today (14/01/09). Is this common to find them in this region, and in a rockpool?

Response

Dear Duncan,

Many thanks for your sighting. An interesting species to find! There are reports of this species from northern Britain, but I do not have any records from Tynemouth. I attach our web page with some basic information on this species http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/Lithodesmaia.htm and I have also cc'd Paul Clark at the NHM who I hope may have more information on its distribution and life history. As a northern species we are particularly interested in monitoring its distribution so I really appreciate this record.
Did you get a photo of the crab by any chance?

Thanks and I hope you will continue to submit records to our scheme.

Becky Seeley


Date asked 06 January 2009

Question

The Natural History Museum has won a large grant from the Big Lottery Fund to provide support for local Natural History Groups. We are undertaking research on behalf of the NHM to find out the needs of local groups and would like to include you in our questionnaire survey. If you are willing to take part please send us the name and contact Email address of one of your officers.

We look forward to hearing from you,
James Hindson, Environment Consultant
John Hughes, Shropshire Wildlife Trust

Please reply to OPALresearch@googlemail.com

Response


Date asked 05 January 2009

Question

where can i go to study marine biology in the UK

Response

Dear Danielle,

Thank you for your enquiry. The University of Plymouth runs BSc (Hons) courses in Marine Biology, see

http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/0732/BSc+(Hons)+Marine+Biology

For other UK Universities running marine biology courses, a Google search turned up the following website which may have some good links to start you off.

http://www.marinebiology.co.uk/unicourses.htm

Good luck in your search for a suitable course.

Guy


Date asked 02 January 2009

Question

I HAVE A BIVALVE I FOUND ON SIDMOUTH BEACH,JACOBS LADDER END ON THE LAST SPRING TIDE DECEMBER 14TH 2008. I HAVE TRIED TO IDENTIFY IT BUT CAN FIND NO ENTRY OF ITS OCCURRENCE IN UK WATERS. I CAN SEND A PHOTOGRAPH OR THE FROZEN SHELL AND CONTENTS. IT RESEMBLES A BROAD RIBBED CARDITA FOUND IN THE CARRABEAN

Response

GB asked for photo


If you have any questions please use our contacts form or alternatively you can phone or write to MarLIN

MarLIN,
The Marine Biological Association,
Citadel Hill,
Plymouth
Devon,
PL1 2PB.

Tel: +44 (0)1752 633336
Fax: +44 (0)1752 633102