MarLIN

information on the biology of species and the ecology of habitats found around the coasts and seas of the British Isles

A red seaweed (Odonthalia dentata)

Distribution data supplied by the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS). To interrogate UK data visit the NBN Atlas.

Summary

Description

Brownish-red to deep purple in colour, darkening with age, with a glossy surface. Frond 2-6 cm across, regularly alternately notched with sharply pointed apices, and thickened in centre forming a midrib in older parts of the plant. Fronds attached to the substratum by a solid discoid holdfast 5-13 mm in diameter, composed of fused radiating, root like, rhizomes.

Recorded distribution in Britain and Ireland

Recorded throughout Scotland and Ireland including the Isle of Man on the west coast of Britain and Flamborough Head on the east coast and an isolated recording in Lyme Bay.

Global distribution

Present from Spitzbergen to the British Isles, and from Arctic Canada to Nova Scotia.

Habitat

Odonthalia dentata can be found growing on boulders, bedrock and mobile substrata in lower-shore pools and from near extreme low water to approximately 20 m depth. Found at moderately to extremely wave-exposed sites and at wave-sheltered sites with exposure to strong tidal currents.

Depth range

-

Identifying features

  • Frond less than 2 mm across main axes.
  • Axes arising singly or in dense tufts with a variable overall shape.
  • Secondary branches arise from the margins of young and mature axes.
  • Reproductive bodies formed in dense clusters along the margins of main axes.

Additional information

Fronds are perennial but plants on mobile substrata do not survive the winter.

Listed by

- none -

Further information sources

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Bibliography

  1. Hardy, F.G. & Guiry, M.D., 2003. A check-list and atlas of the seaweeds of Britain and Ireland. London: British Phycological Society

  2. Hiscock, K., Southward, A., Tittley, I., Jory, A. & Hawkins, S., 2001. The impact of climate change on subtidal and intertidal benthic species in Scotland. Scottish National Heritage Research, Survey and Monitoring Report , no. 182., Edinburgh: Scottish National Heritage

  3. Hiscock, S., 1986b. A field key to the British Red Seaweeds. Taunton: Field Studies Council. [Occasional Publication No.13]

  4. Howson, C.M. & Picton, B.E., 1997. The species directory of the marine fauna and flora of the British Isles and surrounding seas. Belfast: Ulster Museum. [Ulster Museum publication, no. 276.]

  5. JNCC (Joint Nature Conservation Committee), 1999. Marine Environment Resource Mapping And Information Database (MERMAID): Marine Nature Conservation Review Survey Database. [on-line] http://www.jncc.gov.uk/mermaid

  6. Maggs, C.A. & Hommersand, M.H., 1993. Seaweeds of the British Isles: Volume 1 Rhodophycota Part 3A Ceramiales. London: Natural History Museum, Her Majesty's Stationary Office.

  7. Norton, T.A. (ed.), 1985. Provisional Atlas of the Marine Algae of Britain and Ireland. Huntingdon: Biological Records Centre, Institute of Terrestrial Ecology.

  8. Picton, B.E. & Costello, M.J., 1998. BioMar biotope viewer: a guide to marine habitats, fauna and flora of Britain and Ireland. [CD-ROM] Environmental Sciences Unit, Trinity College, Dublin., http://www.itsligo.ie/biomar/

Citation

This review can be cited as:

Skewes, M. 2007. Odonthalia dentata A red seaweed. In Tyler-Walters H. and Hiscock K. (eds) Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Reviews, [on-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Available from: http://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/detail/1588

Last Updated: 29/07/2007