Long clawed porcelain crab (Pisidia longicornis)

Distribution data supplied by the Ocean Biodiversity Information System (OBIS). To interrogate UK data visit the NBN Atlas.Map Help

Summary

Description

A small crab less than 10 mm across the carapace. It is reddish-orange in colour, frequently with patches of pearly white on the carapace or sometimes all of the carapace is white. Long claws and with only three pairs of walking legs apparent and a tiny fifth pair of appendages often concealed.

Recorded distribution in Britain and Ireland

Present all around Britain and Ireland.

Global distribution

Present in the north-east Atlantic from Norway to Angola, west Africa and the whole of the Mediterranean.

Habitat

Present under boulders in the intertidal and common in the circalittoral especially in bryozoan turf.

Depth range

intertidal to depth unknown

Identifying features

  • Carapace less than 10 mm across.
  • Carapace suboval in shape and sparsely setose at most.
  • Chelae long and cylindrical.
  • Three pairs of walking legs.
  • Fifth pair of pereiopods very small and usually concealed.

Additional information

-none-

Listed by

- none -

Biology review

Taxonomy

LevelScientific nameCommon name
PhylumArthropoda
ClassMalacostraca
OrderDecapoda
FamilyPorcellanidae
GenusPisidia
Authority(Linnaeus, 1767)
Recent SynonymsPorcellana longicornis (Linnaeus, 1767)

Biology

ParameterData
Typical abundanceModerate density
Male size range<10mm
Male size at maturity
Female size range3mm
Female size at maturity
Growth formArticulate
Growth rateData deficient
Body flexibility
Mobility
Characteristic feeding methodScavenger
Diet/food source
Typically feeds on
Sociability
Environmental positionEpifaunal
DependencyIndependent.
SupportsNone
Is the species harmful?No information

Biology information

Pisidia longicornis is the most numerically abundant decapod crustacean in sublittoral areas. It occurs in densities of up to 640 /m² (Robinson & Tully, 2000a). Smaldon (1972) suggests that it "may survive to breed for a second or third season" suggesting a lifespan of up to three years.

Habitat preferences

ParameterData
Physiographic preferencesOpen coast, Strait or Sound, Sea loch or Sea lough, Ria or Voe
Biological zone preferencesLower circalittoral, Lower eulittoral, Lower infralittoral, Mid eulittoral, Sublittoral fringe, Upper circalittoral, Upper infralittoral
Substratum / habitat preferencesLarge to very large boulders, Small boulders
Tidal strength preferencesModerately strong 1 to 3 knots (0.5-1.5 m/sec.), Strong 3 to 6 knots (1.5-3 m/sec.), Very strong > 6 knots (>3 m/sec.)
Wave exposure preferencesExposed, Moderately exposed, Sheltered, Very sheltered
Salinity preferencesFull (30-40 psu)
Depth rangeintertidal to depth unknown
Other preferences
Migration PatternNon-migratory or resident

Habitat Information

No text entered

Life history

Adult characteristics

ParameterData
Reproductive typeGonochoristic (dioecious)
Reproductive frequency Annual episodic
Fecundity (number of eggs)100-1,000
Generation timeInsufficient information
Age at maturityInsufficient information
SeasonMarch - September
Life span2-3 years

Larval characteristics

ParameterData
Larval/propagule type-
Larval/juvenile development Planktotrophic
Duration of larval stage1-2 months
Larval dispersal potential Greater than 10 km
Larval settlement periodInsufficient information

Life history information

Ingle (1997) indicates that eggs are present from March to August in southern England and from February to September in the Mediterranean.

Sensitivity reviewHow is sensitivity assessed?

Physical pressures

Use / to open/close text displayed

 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Substratum loss [Show more]

Substratum loss

Benchmark. All of the substratum occupied by the species or biotope under consideration is removed. A single event is assumed for sensitivity assessment. Once the activity or event has stopped (or between regular events) suitable substratum remains or is deposited. Species or community recovery assumes that the substratum within the habitat preferences of the original species or community is present. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis occurs on a variety of substrata especially in the subtidal. Although at least some individuals will be destroyed by the removal of substratum, displaced individuals are likely to find alternative homes. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Smothering [Show more]

Smothering

Benchmark. All of the population of a species or an area of a biotope is smothered by sediment to a depth of 5 cm above the substratum for one month. Impermeable materials, such as concrete, oil, or tar, are likely to have a greater effect. Further details.

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis, being mobile, may escape from smothering events but siltation may remove suitable habitats by clogging underboulders and undergrowth. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Low High Low Moderate
Increase in suspended sediment [Show more]

Increase in suspended sediment

Benchmark. An arbitrary short-term, acute change in background suspended sediment concentration e.g., a change of 100 mg/l for one month. The resultant light attenuation effects are addressed under turbidity, and the effects of rapid settling out of suspended sediment are addressed under smothering. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis most likely feeds as a scavenger and active carnivore so that increase in levels of suspended sediment are unlikely to affect it. However, settlement of suspended silt is addressed in 'Smothering'.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Decrease in suspended sediment [Show more]

Decrease in suspended sediment

Benchmark. An arbitrary short-term, acute change in background suspended sediment concentration e.g., a change of 100 mg/l for one month. The resultant light attenuation effects are addressed under turbidity, and the effects of rapid settling out of suspended sediment are addressed under smothering. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis most likely feeds as a scavenger and active carnivore so that decrease in levels of suspended sediment are unlikely to affect it.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Desiccation [Show more]

Desiccation

  1. A normally subtidal, demersal or pelagic species including intertidal migratory or under-boulder species is continuously exposed to air and sunshine for one hour.
  2. A normally intertidal species or community is exposed to a change in desiccation equivalent to a change in position of one vertical biological zone on the shore, e.g., from upper eulittoral to the mid eulittoral or from sublittoral fringe to lower eulittoral for a period of one year. Further details.

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis lives in habitats that are protected from desiccation and would most likely, because of its mobility, be able to escape desiccation situations such as boulder turning. However, if exposure to air occurs, desiccation effects are likely to be severe. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
High High Moderate Moderate
Increase in emergence regime [Show more]

Increase in emergence regime

Benchmark. A one hour change in the time covered or not covered by the sea for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis lives in shaded damp habitats on the mid to lower shore. If emergence regime changes so that crabs are exposed for longer to dry conditions, the vertical extent of habitat suitable for the crab is likely to be reduced although individual crabs will survive by moving further downshore. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Low Very high Very Low Moderate
Decrease in emergence regime [Show more]

Decrease in emergence regime

Benchmark. A one hour change in the time covered or not covered by the sea for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis is a species that lives in damp places and fully submerged habitats so that decrease in emergence will favour the species.
Tolerant* Not relevant Not sensitive* High
Increase in water flow rate [Show more]

Increase in water flow rate

A change of two categories in water flow rate (view glossary) for 1 year, for example, from moderately strong (1-3 knots) to very weak (negligible). Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis lives in habitats where water flow rate may be from very strong to weak. However, as a cryptic species protected by bryozoan turf, kelp holdfasts etc in the sublittoral, it is unlikely to be affected by 'wash out' which might however occur from under boulders. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Low High Low Moderate
Decrease in water flow rate [Show more]

Decrease in water flow rate

A change of two categories in water flow rate (view glossary) for 1 year, for example, from moderately strong (1-3 knots) to very weak (negligible). Further details

Evidence

The communities in which Pisidia longicornis live are particularly well developed in areas subject to strong tidal flow or strong wave action. In the absence of strong wave action, decrease in water flow rate will lead to siltation of habitats and reduction of the bryozoan turf that Pisidia longicornis favours. A decline in abundance would therefore be expected. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Increase in temperature [Show more]

Increase in temperature

  1. A short-term, acute change in temperature; e.g., a 5°C change in the temperature range for three consecutive days. This definition includes ‘short-term’ thermal discharges.
  2. A long-term, chronic change in temperature; e.g. a 2°C change in the temperature range for a year. This definition includes ‘long term’ thermal discharges.

For intertidal species or communities, the range of temperatures includes the air temperature regime for that species or community. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis occurs in a wide range of temperature regimes from Norway to Angola and it is not therefore expected that crabs would be adversely affected by increase in temperature at the level of the benchmark.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Decrease in temperature [Show more]

Decrease in temperature

  1. A short-term, acute change in temperature; e.g., a 5°C change in the temperature range for three consecutive days. This definition includes ‘short-term’ thermal discharges.
  2. A long-term, chronic change in temperature; e.g. a 2°C change in the temperature range for a year. This definition includes ‘long term’ thermal discharges.

For intertidal species or communities, the range of temperatures includes the air temperature regime for that species or community. Further details

Evidence

Long-clawed porcelain crabs were adversely affected by the 1962-63 winter in Britain. Crisp (1964) records that many hundreds were found dead on the strandline at Oxwich, south Wales. In other locations, they were not found on the shore (although could have migrated offshore). Overall, it seems that some mortality is likely and an intolerance of Intermediate is suggested. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low High
Increase in turbidity [Show more]

Increase in turbidity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., two categories of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one month, such as from medium to extreme turbidity.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., one category of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one year, such as from low to medium turbidity. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis is a scavenger and is only likely to be adversely affected by increased turbidity through visual impairment. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Low High Low Moderate
Decrease in turbidity [Show more]

Decrease in turbidity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., two categories of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one month, such as from medium to extreme turbidity.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., one category of the water clarity scale (see glossary) for one year, such as from low to medium turbidity. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis is a scavenger and is unlikely to be adversely affected by decreased turbidity.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Increase in wave exposure [Show more]

Increase in wave exposure

A change of two ranks on the wave exposure scale (view glossary) e.g., from Exposed to Extremely exposed for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis lives in locations where it could be displaced by strong water movement. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Decrease in wave exposure [Show more]

Decrease in wave exposure

A change of two ranks on the wave exposure scale (view glossary) e.g., from Exposed to Extremely exposed for a period of one year. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis lives underboulders, in kelps holdfasts and amongst bryozoan turfs especially. A decrease in wave exposure may allow silt to settle thus removing suitable habitats by clogging underboulders and undergrowth. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Noise [Show more]

Noise

  1. Underwater noise levels e.g., the regular passing of a 30-metre trawler at 100 metres or a working cutter-suction transfer dredge at 100 metres for one month during important feeding or breeding periods.
  2. Atmospheric noise levels e.g., the regular passing of a Boeing 737 passenger jet 300 metres overhead for one month during important feeding or breeding periods. Further details

Evidence

Pisidia longicornis is unlikely to react to noise as it has no appropriate organs. It will most likely react to vibrations resulting from noise but is probably tolerant at the benchmark level.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Visual presence [Show more]

Visual presence

Benchmark. The continuous presence for one month of moving objects not naturally found in the marine environment (e.g., boats, machinery, and humans) within the visual envelope of the species or community under consideration. Further details

Evidence

Crabs scuttle away when boulders are overturned - most likely as a response to increased light levels but also, since they have eyes, visual presence. The crabs are mobile so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be very rapid.
Low Immediate Not sensitive Moderate
Abrasion & physical disturbance [Show more]

Abrasion & physical disturbance

Benchmark. Force equivalent to a standard scallop dredge landing on or being dragged across the organism. A single event is assumed for assessment. This factor includes mechanical interference, crushing, physical blows against, or rubbing and erosion of the organism or habitat of interest. Where trampling is relevant, the evidence and trampling intensity will be reported in the rationale. Further details.

Evidence

The crabs are easily crushed by abrasion by mobile cobbles and larger substrata or by mooring chains. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
High High Moderate Moderate
Displacement [Show more]

Displacement

Benchmark. Removal of the organism from the substratum and displacement from its original position onto a suitable substratum. A single event is assumed for assessment. Further details

Evidence

Displacement is unlikely to adversely affect Pisidia longicornis unless it is trapped in a new unsuitable location. The species can move to a suitable area.
Low Very high Very Low High

Chemical pressures

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 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Synthetic compound contamination [Show more]

Synthetic compound contamination

Sensitivity is assessed against the available evidence for the effects of contaminants on the species (or closely related species at low confidence) or community of interest. For example:

  • evidence of mass mortality of a population of the species or community of interest (either short or long term) in response to a contaminant will be ranked as high sensitivity;
  • evidence of reduced abundance, or extent of a population of the species or community of interest (either short or long term) in response to a contaminant will be ranked as intermediate sensitivity;
  • evidence of sub-lethal effects or reduced reproductive potential of a population of the species or community of interest will be assessed as low sensitivity.

The evidence used is stated in the rationale. Where the assessment can be based on a known activity then this is stated. The tolerance to contaminants of species of interest will be included in the rationale when available; together with relevant supporting material. Further details.

Evidence

No information has been found specifically on Pisidia longicornis but crustaceans in general are fairly tolerant. Bryan & Gibbs (1991) report that crabs appear to be relatively resistant to TBT although some deformity of regenerated limbs has been observed. In the early 1960's in Washington, experimental application of a broad range of pesticides was tested for use on shrimp-infested oyster grounds identified carbaryl (1-napthol n-methyl carbamate; sold under the trade name Sevin) to be an effective method to control burrowing shrimp (Feldman et al., 2000). Carbaryl, a non-persistent organocarbamate pesticide that is extremely toxic to arthropods, was applied at 9kg/ha to remove shrimps from oyster grounds. In view of the equivocal results from different studies and with different chemicals, an intolerance of intermediate is suggested with a very low confidence. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Very low
Heavy metal contamination [Show more]

Heavy metal contamination

Evidence

No information has been found specifically on Pisidia longicornis but crustaceans in general are fairly tolerant. Crompton (1997) reports that the concentrations above which mortality of crustaceans can occur is 0.01-0.1mg/l for mercury, copper and cadmium, 0.1-1mg/l for zinc, arsenic and nickel and 1-10mg/l for lead and chromium. Crustaceans are generally regarded as being more intolerant of cadmium than other groups (McLusky, 1986).The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Low
Hydrocarbon contamination [Show more]

Hydrocarbon contamination

Evidence

No information has been found specifically on Pisidia longicornis but crustaceans in general are fairly tolerant. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Low
Radionuclide contamination [Show more]

Radionuclide contamination

Evidence

No information has been found for radionuclides adversely affecting crustaceans.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive High
Changes in nutrient levels [Show more]

Changes in nutrient levels

Evidence

No information has been found for nutrients adversely affecting crustaceans.
Tolerant Not relevant Not sensitive Moderate
Increase in salinity [Show more]

Increase in salinity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., a change of two categories from the MNCR salinity scale for one week (view glossary) such as from full to reduced.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., a change of one category from the MNCR salinity scale for one year (view glossary) such as from reduced to low. Further details.

Evidence

Long-clawed porcelain crabs are apparently not recorded in low salinity conditions but do occur in the lower reaches of estuaries suggesting that they require full or variable salinity. Mortality may therefore occur in events where salinity falls significantly. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Moderate
Decrease in salinity [Show more]

Decrease in salinity

  1. A short-term, acute change; e.g., a change of two categories from the MNCR salinity scale for one week (view glossary) such as from full to reduced.
  2. A long-term, chronic change; e.g., a change of one category from the MNCR salinity scale for one year (view glossary) such as from reduced to low. Further details.

Evidence

Long-clawed porcelain crabs are apparently not recorded in low salinity conditions but do occur in the lower reaches of estuaries suggesting that they require full or variable salinity. A reduction in salinity, especially if it occurs in already estuarine conditions, is likely therefore to have a significant adverse effect. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
High High Moderate Moderate
Changes in oxygenation [Show more]

Changes in oxygenation

Benchmark.  Exposure to a dissolved oxygen concentration of 2 mg/l for one week. Further details.

Evidence

The crabs live in areas which are well oxygenated so that decrease in oxygen levels below ambient may be adverse. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
Intermediate High Low Low

Biological pressures

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 IntoleranceRecoverabilitySensitivityEvidence / Confidence
Introduction of microbial pathogens/parasites [Show more]

Introduction of microbial pathogens/parasites

Benchmark. Sensitivity can only be assessed relative to a known, named disease, likely to cause partial loss of a species population or community. Further details.

Evidence

Insufficient
information
No information No information No information Moderate
Introduction of non-native species [Show more]

Introduction of non-native species

Sensitivity assessed against the likely effect of the introduction of alien or non-native species in Britain or Ireland. Further details.

Evidence

Insufficient
information
No information Not relevant No information Not relevant
Extraction of this species [Show more]

Extraction of this species

Benchmark. Extraction removes 50% of the species or community from the area under consideration. Sensitivity will be assessed as 'intermediate'. The habitat remains intact or recovers rapidly. Any effects of the extraction process on the habitat itself are addressed under other factors, e.g. displacement, abrasion and physical disturbance, and substratum loss. Further details.

Evidence

Extraction of this species is not known to occur. The crabs are mobile and have a planktonic larva so that recolonization/recovery is likely to be fairly rapid.
High High Moderate Moderate
Extraction of other species [Show more]

Extraction of other species

Benchmark. A species that is a required host or prey for the species under consideration (and assuming that no alternative host exists) or a keystone species in a biotope is removed. Any effects of the extraction process on the habitat itself are addressed under other factors, e.g. displacement, abrasion and physical disturbance, and substratum loss. Further details.

Evidence

Insufficient
information
No information Not relevant No information Not relevant

Additional information

No text entered

Importance review

Policy/legislation

- no data -

Status

Non-native

ParameterData
Native-
Origin-
Date ArrivedNot relevant

Importance information

Psidia longicornis is considered to be the most abundant decapod crustacean on sublittoral rocky surfaces. However, it is small and, as a scavenger, is not greatly important in functioning of a community.

Bibliography

  1. Bryan, G.W. & Gibbs, P.E., 1991. Impact of low concentrations of tributyltin (TBT) on marine organisms: a review. In: Metal ecotoxicology: concepts and applications (ed. M.C. Newman & A.W. McIntosh), pp. 323-361. Boston: Lewis Publishers Inc.

  2. Crisp, D.J. (ed.), 1964. The effects of the severe winter of 1962-63 on marine life in Britain. Journal of Animal Ecology, 33, 165-210.

  3. Crompton, T.R., 1997. Toxicants in the aqueous ecosystem. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

  4. Crothers, J. & Crothers, M., 1988. A key to the crabs and crab-like animals of British inshore waters. Somerset, England: Field Studies Council. [AIDGAP guide, no. 155.]

  5. Feldman, K.L., Armstrong, D.A., Dumbauld, B.R., DeWitt, T.H. & Doty, D.C., 2000. Oysters, crabs, and burrowing shrimp: review of an environmental conflict over aquatic resources and pesticide use in Washington State's (USA) coastal estuaries. Estuaries, 23, 141-176. DOI https://doi.org/10.2307/1352824

  6. Howson, C.M. & Picton, B.E., 1997. The species directory of the marine fauna and flora of the British Isles and surrounding seas. Belfast: Ulster Museum. [Ulster Museum publication, no. 276.]

  7. Ingle, R., 1997. Crayfishes, lobsters and crabs of Europe. An illustrated guide to common and traded species. London: Chapman and Hall.

  8. Lindley, J.A., 1987. Continuous plankton records: the geographical distribution and seasonal cycles of decapod crustacean larvae and pelagic post-larvae in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 67, 145-167.

  9. McLusky, D.S., Bryant, V. & Campbell, R., 1986. The effects of temperature and salinity on the toxicity of heavy metals to marine and estuarine invertebrates. Oceanography and Marine Biology: an Annual Review, 24, 481-520.

  10. Robinson, M. & Tully, O., 2000. Dynamics of a subtidal population of the porcellanid crab Pisidia longicornis (Decapoda: Crustacea). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 80, 75-83.

  11. Robinson, M. & Tully, O., 2000. Seasonal variation in community structure and recruitment of benthic decapods in a sub-tidal cobble habitat. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 206, 181-191.

  12. Smaldon, G., 1972. Population structure and breeding biology of Pisidia longicornis and Porcellana platycheles. Marine Biology, 17, 171-179.

Datasets

  1. Bristol Regional Environmental Records Centre, 2017. BRERC species records recorded over 15 years ago. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/h1ln5p accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-25.

  2. Centre for Environmental Data and Recording, 2018. Ulster Museum Marine Surveys of Northern Ireland Coastal Waters. Occurrence dataset https://www.nmni.com/CEDaR/CEDaR-Centre-for-Environmental-Data-and-Recording.aspx accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-09-25.

  3. Cofnod – North Wales Environmental Information Service, 2018. Miscellaneous records held on the Cofnod database. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/hcgqsi accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-25.

  4. Environmental Records Information Centre North East, 2018. ERIC NE Combined dataset to 2017. Occurrence dataset: http://www.ericnortheast.org.ukl accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-09-38

  5. Fenwick, 2018. Aphotomarine. Occurrence dataset http://www.aphotomarine.com/index.html Accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-10-01

  6. Fife Nature Records Centre, 2018. St Andrews BioBlitz 2014. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/erweal accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-27.

  7. Fife Nature Records Centre, 2018. St Andrews BioBlitz 2015. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/xtrbvy accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-27.

  8. Fife Nature Records Centre, 2018. St Andrews BioBlitz 2016. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/146yiz accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-27.

  9. Isle of Wight Local Records Centre, 2017. IOW Natural History & Archaeological Society Marine Invertebrate Records 1853- 2011. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/d9amhg accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-09-27.

  10. Kent Wildlife Trust, 2018. Biological survey of the intertidal chalk reefs between Folkestone Warren and Kingsdown, Kent 2009-2011. Occurrence dataset: https://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/ accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-10-01.

  11. Kent Wildlife Trust, 2018. Kent Wildlife Trust Shoresearch Intertidal Survey 2004 onwards. Occurrence dataset: https://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/ accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-10-01.

  12. Manx Biological Recording Partnership, 2017. Isle of Man wildlife records from 01/01/2000 to 13/02/2017. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/mopwow accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-01.

  13. Manx Biological Recording Partnership, 2018. Isle of Man historical wildlife records 1990 to 1994. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/aru16v accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-01.

  14. Manx Biological Recording Partnership, 2018. Isle of Man historical wildlife records 1990 to 1994. Occurrence dataset:https://doi.org/10.15468/aru16v accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-01.

  15. National Trust, 2017. National Trust Species Records. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/opc6g1 accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-01.

  16. NBN (National Biodiversity Network) Atlas. Available from: https://www.nbnatlas.org.

  17. OBIS (Ocean Biodiversity Information System),  2024. Global map of species distribution using gridded data. Available from: Ocean Biogeographic Information System. www.iobis.org. Accessed: 2024-05-21

  18. Outer Hebrides Biological Recording, 2018. Invertebrates (except insects), Outer Hebrides. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/hpavud accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-01.

  19. South East Wales Biodiversity Records Centre, 2018. SEWBReC Myriapods, Isopods, and allied species (South East Wales). Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/rvxsqs accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-02.

  20. South East Wales Biodiversity Records Centre, 2018. Dr Mary Gillham Archive Project. Occurance dataset: http://www.sewbrec.org.uk/ accessed via NBNAtlas.org on 2018-10-02

  21. Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, 2018. Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Shoresearch. Occurrence dataset: https://doi.org/10.15468/1nw3ch accessed via GBIF.org on 2018-10-02.

Citation

This review can be cited as:

Hiscock, K. 2008. Pisidia longicornis Long clawed porcelain crab. In Tyler-Walters H. and Hiscock K. Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key Information Reviews, [on-line]. Plymouth: Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. [cited 21-05-2024]. Available from: https://www.marlin.ac.uk/species/detail/1362

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Last Updated: 03/06/2008